The latter half of the 19th century, the Weimaraner was converted from a bear and deer hunter to a ‘fur and feathers’ dog.

The Upland Obsession’s Dog Breed Spotlight – Weimaraner

Today, I wanted to introduce another great upland hunting website called Upland Obsession and his continued efforts to focus on particular great hunting breeds. We will be seeing more great breeds from him in the near future!


Kicking things off here with the Dog Breed Spotlight is the Weimaraner. Perhaps my 2nd favorite dog to have hunted over, these taller dogs have a nice advantage while hunting the CRP fields. Also I like that their fur doesn’t collect cockle burs. I credit a lot of my own labs pointing success from hunting over my dad’s old Weimaraner “Wyatt” who died way to young.

The latter half of the 19th century, the Weimaraner was converted from a bear and deer hunter to a ‘fur and feathers’ dog.

The latter half of the 19th century, the Weimaraner was converted from a bear and deer hunter to a ‘fur and feathers’ dog.

So, let’s roll right into the Upland Obsession’s article…

History

The original Weimar Pointers appeared in the 19th century. They were prized for their versatile hunting skills and remarkable character. In the early part of the century, the Nobles of Weimar were avid sportsmen and hunted a variety of big game. They required Weimaraners to be excellent trackers, swift, courageous and durable. Their breeding programs aimed to develop these characteristics. More likely by accident, they produced the distinctive gray coat color that is the hallmark of the breed.

The Nobles rigidly controlled the availability of the dogs. To insure the future of the breed, the German Weimaraner Club was formed. Membership was restricted and only members were permitted to own and breed dogs. Few outsiders really knew much about the breed. Legends developed about the great gray hunting dog. Type and temperament was refined and eventually, during the latter half of the 19th century, the Weimaraner was converted from a bear and deer hunter to a ‘fur and feathers’ dog.

In 1928 a New England sportsman, Howard Knight, applied for membership in the German Club. Despite his promise to protect the purity of the breed, the club sent Knight two sterilized dogs. He was determined to acquire foundation stock. Finally, in 1938, three females and a male puppy were sent to him. Others joined Knight’s efforts and in 1942, the Weimaraner Club of America was formed; a standard was created for the breed. American Kennel Club recognition was applied for and dogs began exhibition in obedience. At the end of 1942, AKC recognition was granted and the breed had it’s coming out at Westminster in 1943.

To continue learning more about this great breed, click here!

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